Posts tagged #Bedside - New York Times

BEDSIDE - What 'Nurse Jackie' Gets Right About the E.R.

A lot of nurses hate the Showtime series “Nurse Jackie,” which will wrap up its sixth season on Sunday evening. Actually, to be precise, they hate the show’s lead character, the emergency department nurse Jackie Peyton. There’s much to dislike: She is an adulterer, a liar, an unreliable mother and, most significantly, addicted to prescription painkillers. (That’s hardly giving anything away, but be warned: spoilers ahead.)

Posted on June 29, 2014 .

BEDSIDE - Lost in Clinical Translation

A classic “Far Side” cartoon shows a man talking forcefully to his dog. The man says: “Okay, Ginger! I’ve had it! You stay out of the garbage!” But the dog hears only: “Blah blah Ginger blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah Ginger …”

As a nurse, I often worry that patients’ comprehension of doctors and nurses is equally limited — except what the patient hears from us is: “Blah blah blah Heart Attack blah blah blah Cancer.”

Posted on February 8, 2014 and filed under Bedside, New York Times.

BEDSIDE - Out of Network, Out of Luck

For several hundred patients at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, it started with a certified letter informing them that they were no longer allowed to see their physicians. The reason? They were unlucky enough to have insurance called Community Blue, which is offered by a rival hospital system. Astoundingly, they were barred even if they could pay for the care themselves.

Posted on October 14, 2013 and filed under Bedside, New York Times.

BEDSIDE - When No One Is on Call

We nurses all have stories — if we’re lucky, it’s just one — about the time we failed a patient. It’s usually a problem of being too busy: too many cases, too many procedures to keep track of until one critical step, just one, slips through our frenetic fingers and someone gets hurt.

Posted on August 17, 2013 and filed under Bedside, New York Times.

BEDSIDE - Healing the Hospital Hierarchy

A hospital is, by its nature, the scene of constant life-or-death situations. It’s the work we nurses, doctors and other health professionals do; we chose it. The threat of harm can jazz you up or bring you down, but what it should demand, always, is the highest possible level of professionalism. Who’s at risk when that doesn’t occur?

Posted on March 16, 2013 and filed under New York Times.

BEDSIDE - When the Patient Knows Best

In late October 2010, Amy Berman, a registered nurse and a senior program officer at the John A. Hartford Foundation in New York City, received a diagnosis of Stage 4 inflammatory breast cancer. This Stage 4 cancer is always metastatic, meaning it has spread to other parts of the body. There is zero probability of a cure, though five-year survival rates vary for individuals.

Posted on January 19, 2013 and filed under Bedside, New York Times.