PRESS FOR THE SHIFT

The New York Times - Best Sellers, November 2015

INTERVIEWS

C-SPAN's After Words
September 30, 2015

NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross
September 28, 2015


The Leonard Lopate Show
September 28, 2015

 

Barnes & Noble Review
September 23, 2015

REVIEWS

Boston Globe
September 29, 2015

The Wall Street Journal
September 18, 2015

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
September 22, 2015


The need for a pulse-ox device becomes extreme in the hospital when a patient who had been stable suddenly gasps for breath and begins to turn blue. A pulse-ox is a small piece of equipment that clamps onto a patient's finger and registers her oxygen level. Some cost a couple hundred dollars, but the cheapest retail for around $20. When I worked at a teaching hospital in the UPMC system in Pittsburgh, my hospital floor usually had two or three of these devices, and though we nurses begged for more, we were always told the money wasn't "there" in the budget, despite our hospital system's obvious wealth (operating revenues of $14 billion in the first nine months of 2018).


What I’m Reading| How We Fail the Dying
American Journal of Nursing, June, 2019

“Knockin’ on Heaven's Door” is a Bob Dylan song, but I prefer the cover by Guns N’ Roses, which adds a rock inflection to what is basically a song about dying: “That cold black cloud is comin’ down / Feels like I'm knockin’ on heaven's door.” It's an apt title for Katy Butler's book, which details her father's slow decline after a stroke, and the relatively quick decline of her mother afterward.


Opinion | Nurse: An abortion is not an execution, Mr. President
CNN, April 30, 2019

Talking about abortion in terms of ethical decision making may be troubling to abortion foes, but besides being a mother, I'm also a nurse who cares for patients at the end of their lives. For me, looking at arguments about abortion in the context of how best to care for dying patients can clarify the complexity of the ethical issues in abortion.


Opinion | How to Make Doctors Think About Death
New York Times, April 27, 2019

End-of-life treatment guidelines would help families, physicians and nurses confront the inevitable with care and compassion.


No Quick Fix for the Culture of Prescribing that Drives Medication Overload
The Health Care Blog, April 25, 2019

In my mid-twenties, I was twice prescribed the common antihistamine Benadryl for allergies. However, my body’s reaction to the drug was anything but common. Instead of my hives fading, they erupted all over my body and my arms filled with extra fluid until they were almost twice normal size. I subsequently described my experience to a new allergist, who dismissed it as “coincidence.”


The Language of Kindness – An Immersive Experience
American Journal of Nursing, February 2019

As a child, Christie Watson could not decide what kind of career she wanted. Marine biology appealed to her, as she had “visions of wearing a swimsuit all day… and swimming with dolphins.” A teacher proposed law, telling her parents “[s]he can argue all day long.” After quitting school at 16, Watson took a job with an organization called Community Service Volunteers. A nurse there suggested she try nursing: “They give you a grant and somewhere to live.” To the surprise of Watson's family and Watson herself, nursing stuck, and I'm thankful it did.


Still Working: “Care Work”
WESA, Pittsburgh’s NPR Station, November 28, 2018

People at every stage of life depend on care from professionals. Jean Thompson Bird, a teacher at the Carnegie Mellon University Children’s School, introduces children to the wider world. Theresa Brown, a hospice nurse at Allegheny Health Network, works to keep people comfortable at the end of their lives. Rabbi Seth Adelson at Beth Shalom in Squirrel Hill cares for the more than 600 families in his congregation, many of whom are struggling in the wake of the Tree of Life shooting last month. And Kim Hardin, a therapist in McCandless, helps clients process trauma.